Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Another one for the bucket list

Building software is exciting, but cannot be the only thing. In my bucket list, one item has been outstanding a long time: To publish a novel that I had started writing in 2006. It started as science fiction and a test of whether I could write a novel almost 100% dialogue. It was fun in the beginning, dreaming of the future and imagining a conversation with my grandchildren. Alas, finding an end proved to take years and almost became a challenge beyond my patience. Then, one day, it came to me and I finally wrote "The End".

Finishing a draft of a short story and publishing it are universes apart I discovered. Editing is harder than writing, proofreading is mindlessly hard. Even when you are done with months of all of that, how do you publish an ebook? I ran aground again. Then on my birthday, I decided it had to be done no matter if less than perfect. As Facebook admonishes its staff "done beats perfect", and so it was.
Amazon was the first channel for the Kindle version of The Yoda Machine. It was easier than I had imagined, quick, and free.  You can find it here. Soon I discovered that despite the supposed popularity of Kindle, none of my friends had it. Kindle Reader is available free for every possible mobile device and OS, but getting family and friends to install it appeared to be too heavy lifting.
Draft2Digital was the next platform I tried for the Epub version of The Yoda Machine. Not nearly as automatic as Amazon to format correctly, but still quick and easy and free. It automatically submits your ebook to a multitude of publishers (Kobo, Scribd, B&N and more), it collects royalties and it generates ebooks in various formats (epub, mobi, pdf) that you can download in finished form for whatever purpose you wish.

So, one more is off the bucket list. Now back to writing software a clearly more appreciated endeavor.

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Thursday, June 28, 2018

Venture Update - March 2018

The adventure goes on. The thrill continues...

  • Our customer base is growing.
  • The "quick and dirty" system we had developed as a prototype proved to be solid and clean enough to go to production. Thus far it has processed over 50,000 tickets for over 400,000 transactions by 35+ mobile app users in Arizona and Nevada. 
  • A sufficiently intuitive UI allowed us to roll out two installations with no direct contact or communication with end users, virtually 0 training time
  • The Zoho platform we chose for development and production has proven reliable and very affordable for our customers.
  • To back up our own resources we found a community of independent, certified Zoho Consultants from which we can draw resources to handle new projects
  • The system's underlying structure is proving to be adaptable to various instances of the gig-worker operating model.
and the thrill of building goes on

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